hahn lab

research We are looking for grad students, postdocs and technicians. Please see contacts.

Our lab focuses on two synergistic areas: developing molecular tools to visualize and control signaling in living cells, and questions re the specialized cell biology of blood cells. Our biological studies center on clinically important cell behaviors -- phagocytosis, platelet production, and T cell interactions. We also try to uncover basic signaling principles using cell protrusion as a model of chemical-mechanical interactions in signaling networks. We have begun studies of the cancer microenvironment in 3D models and in vivo.

Our molecular imaging tools are focused on specific molecules for our biological studies, but we aim to produce broadly applicable approaches that others can use to visualize and control protein behavior. These include new biosensor designs that minimally perturb signaling, enabling us to examine low abundance proteins and to control and visualize multiple proteins simultaneously. We are developing means to control endogenous proteins with light, and studying allosteric networks to produce engineered domains that can be inserted into proteins where they confer control by light or small molecules. By precisely producing and visualizing localized transients in protein activity, we examine how spatio-temporal dynamics control cell decision making.

We are grateful to be working closely with outstanding collaborators who focus on computational image analysis, modeling signaling dynamics, and developing novel microscopes. In many cases, students and postdoctoral fellows work in collaborative projects between laboratories.

***UNDER CONTRUCTION***

Ongoing research directions in our laboratory:

Fluorescent biosensors.

Rac1 FLARE biosensor reveals dynamics of Rac activation in protrusions
Rac1 FLARE biosensor reveals dynamics of Rac activation in protrusions; Chris Welch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Engineering proteins to confer regulation by light or by small molecules.

UniRapR domain confers drug sensitivity on kinases in vivo
UniRapR domain confers drug sensitivity on kinases in vivo; Onur Daglilyan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Examining the spatio-temporal dynamics and regulation of Rho family GTPase signaling pathways.

Leucocytes induce cups in endothelial cells
Leucocytes induce cups in endothelial cells; Jaap Schroeder, Burridge Lab, UNC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Novel dyes to illuminate cell biology and protein behaviors.

Dmitriy Gremyachinskiy sheds light on dye chemistry
Dmitriy Gremyachinskiy sheds light on dye chemistry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quantitative microscopy and analysis of signaling circuits / systems biology.

Biosensor fluctuation analysis reveals GEF/GTPase feedback loops. Hunter Elliot, Danuser lab, Harvard
Biosensor fluctuation analysis reveals GEF/GTPase feedback loops. Hunter Elliot, Danuser lab, Harvard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to our collaborators!


Thanks to the following organizations,  and to the US and NC taxpayers,  for their support:

NIH logo American Cancer Society logoNational Heart Assn logo
The Leukemia Lymphoma Society logoArthritis Foundation LogoCell Migration Consortium logo
US Dept. of Defense LogoDeutche Forschungsgemeinschaft logo
UNC CIDD logoUniversity Cancer Research Fund logo
NIDKK logo Autism Speaks logo Terran funding logo

 

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